Sunday, February 27, 2011

Process and Escape...

Scarves laid out dry

Wet out and covered with thin plastic

On the machine by Feltcraft


Laying out bag while scarves on machine (corriedale roving)

After first 30 minutes under plastic...this is where I think "crap, things are not sticking!". I wet out where needed, add a few fibres if needed, replace plastic and back in the machine.



When I move my scarves to my table, I have to put my bag layout under the table (lots of back and forth)

Okay...the scarves were in the machine for 2 thirty minute cycles with the plastic (checking and switching rolling ends in between) and 4 cycles of thirty with out the plastic (alternating ends) Now they are holding togther enough to begin fulling.
That is 3 hours in the machine total and my rolling and checking etc, in between. It would take less time by hand, but much more wear and tear on my shoulders.

I gather then up and will now work on each one individually. I gently drop a few times and knead, checking that edges are not sticking to themselves, which they still will , at this point.


...now some fulling on the washboard

Time to cut holes and then I full more on the washboard to heal the holes (very important) I do this with each scarf, setting them aside as I finish and rinse them all together. Fulling of the scarves took me 2 hours.
Rinse and spin in my handy spinner




Scarves are rinsed and spun and ironed flat and left to dry to the side and now I can work on my bag! (I accidentally deleted the finished scarf image close up!)

Well, I received an email asking if I had some scarves "laying around" if I could bring them to the new Water + Wool gallery when I go down on the weekend. No...I do not have any laying around, but it was a motivator to get in the studio, which you may have noticed, have been itching to do. I have documented my day above. I usually do so in reverse order so the finished pieces are the first image, but will do so in the order I did them this time. So, I spent the whole day making scarves and laying out a bag (as seen below) while watching "Toddlers and Tiaras" on my studio TV. I swear I lost brain cells watching. I usually listen to public radio while working, occasionally a good design show, but I have vowed no more shows about horders, babies wearing false eyelashes and people that eat from ashtrays...what the heck am I doing!? It truly must be a form of escape. From now on, I think my escape will be back to the left of centre discussions on the CBC and a big batt of wool....much healthier! I must do that today to recover! In any case, see above for my (not so) exciting day!

Visit my site www.andrea-graham.com

12 comments:

saraz said...

I so enjoyed reading about your day, especially since it sounded alot like mine! Different techniques, an ageing Mom to care for and an active Jack Russell, but none the less, very similar to what goes on in my studio. Your work is always very exciting and inspiring.

KerryFelter said...

This post is for people who think that felting is easy! Even with a machine doing some of the work, it's a long process. Your scarves are fab, by the way. I think this mosaic tile technique is the same one that Pam de Groot will be teaching us this summer--looking forward to it very much!

Ammi said...

Love Love Love...the process and the comments. NPR VS Mindless TV programs. It's a toss up for me. I live in a 14 X 14 ft. room with my 6 ft table in the middle. I'm lucky to live with my family including grandchildren. Your blog pops up on my email everyday. What an inspiration. Thank you for sharing.
Question: Are you using prefelt on your mosaic tile scarf?

Andrea Graham- Feltmaker said...

Yes, prefelt! Not sure about Pam's "mosaic" technique. I have been doing these scarves for years and call them my "collage scarves". I am sure Pam's class will be wonderful. I have a Love/hate relationship with prefelt (I have recieved heck on more than one occasion for saying so) I could not do production work at a price ($150-225)I would consider reasonable without it. Layout out would add hours to the task and require me to hand roll a bit before the machine (for me anyway)My dislike is that it is perceived as "easy" and I see it for sale in garments and scarves in an un-fulled state...although I see this in regular layout felt, as well...but, hey, whatcha gonna do?

Mercury said...

Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I like to read yours blog and to look your photos, it would be desirable to repeat your beauty! Thanks!

vilterietje said...

thank you very much for the clear explanation. especially about the holes. your wordk is great an my admiration for you too, so walk in the clouds if you want:)

luciebeebee said...

Thank you very much for sharing your hard day's work: I find it very inspiring to see your work in progress.

Andrea Graham- Feltmaker said...

oh goody...permission to walk on the clouds :o)

feelfelt said...

Andrea, thanks for showing how the feltmaking machine works there! I knew that is was a process to get to know your machine, and you have shown that! I also loved the fact that you have mentioned that something did not work. And a pivotal thing, feltmaking is not easy...

www.fabulousfelt.blogspot.com

Andrea Graham- Feltmaker said...

There are steps along the way in every project that "do not work" that involve trouble shooting. It is with experience and patience that these are resolved!

Ginny Huber said...

I do enjoy your process photos and commentary and of course, the completed creations!; And I had no idea that using the machine was such a lot of work!

Kate Ramsey FabulousFelt said...

that is what stops me from buying the machine, loads of work.

time to relax

time to relax
Liberatio Captivus